Amazon Music Unlimited vs. Spotify: How Do They Compare.
In the summer of 2015, Apple decided to take on Spotify with the launch of a major new paid music service built into the Music appMusic is nothing new to Amazon. Its been offering MP3s for sale for years, while Prime members can access several million

In the summer of 2015, Apple decided to take on Spotify with the launch of a major new paid music service built into the Music app

Music is nothing new to Amazon. It's been offering MP3s for sale for years, while Prime members can access several million tracks via Amazon Music . But Amazon Music Unlimited opens the company's entire catalog to those willing to pay extra.

The big difference between Spotify and Amazon Music Unlimited is Amazon offers a tier of service geared entirely toward use on devices powered by Amazon's own Alexa A.I. assistant—specifically the popular Amazon Echo , Echo Dot , and the portable Echo Tap. Just ask Alexa to start a free trial. Access via Alexa also features something called Side-by-Sides, which is sort of like a DVD commentary from an artist played along with a music track.

It is quite incredible how much stuff you get once you sign up for Amazon Prime. Not only do you get to watch movies and TV series online, but you can also get free shipping on your orders in the US, you get a free Prime book every month, you get access to the Prime Reading (lending library), you get free unlimited storage for photos and you can also stream music for free with Prime Music. But, how good is actually Prime Music? I have used Spotify to listen to music for a long time, but recently I decided to take a closer look at Prime Music to see how good the service actually is. Could it work for me to cancel my Spotify subscription in order to use Prime Music only?

Two millions songs are a lot, but it is not enough if you want to listen to all the newest songs from your favorite artists. And it is not enough if you want to listen to all your favorite songs from old times either. It feels more like a bit of luck if the artist and the song you are looking for is actually available with Amazon Prime. So, this is the disadvantage with Prime Music. But, considering the fact that you get it for free, it is still a great bonus coming with your Amazon Prime subscription.

If you have an Amazon Echo, Dot or a Tap, then you can sign up for only 4 USD a month to get access to all songs and play music unlimited on ONE device, and one device only. This will not work on computers or cell phones, only on the actual Echo, Dot or Tap you use to sign up.

I’m a longtime user of Spotify, a streaming music service that, for about $10 a month, offers unlimited access to a music catalog of some 30 million songs. I’ve gone so far as to delete my gigabyte-upon-gigabyte collection of music from my computer and phone, moving it to an external drive to save space. That drive collects a lot of dust in my desk drawer. So long live concert bootlegs.

Spotify has a free tier, but I pay for the advertisement-free version because I stream enough music to make it worthwhile. That said, I’ll hop on any chance to save a few bucks. So when Amazon recently unveiled a streaming service costing $7.99 for Prime subscribers , I figured, why not? (Amazon Music Unlimited costs $9.99 for non-Prime members; Prime costs $99 a year and includes free two-day shipping, among an ever-expanding list of other benefits .)

Amazon Music Unlimited has everything you’d expect from a music streaming service in 2016. For my tastes at least, the library is comparable to Spotify’s. (Amazon says it has “tens of millions” of songs.) Though any service will, obviously, miss anything that’s exclusive to the other major streaming platforms, including Apple Music and Tidal. Amazon has “hand-curated” playlists and stations, and you can download music to your phone over Wi-Fi for offline listening.

Boasting just a million tunes under its belt from launch – Spotify has over 30 million songs, Deezer 35 million, Apple has ‘tens of millions’ – Amazon might not be able to match the more established competition in terms of volume but its signed up some big names to get it off the ground; One Direction, Royal Blood and George Ezra rub shoulders with Bob Dylan, Madonna and David Bowie in Amazon’s VIP lounge. 

While Amazon’s own library is a little on the thin ground compared to the rest, one neat trick is that you can mix songs from your own Amazon MP3 collection with tracks from Prime Music, which you can download for offline play. 

Read our ears-on review of Apple Music Like Prime Instant Video, Prime Music is free for folks with Amazon Prime accounts. It’s the latest sweetener for those who’ve shelled out for a £79 annual Amazon Prime subscription. 

In the summer of 2015, Apple decided to take on Spotify with the launch of a major new paid music service built into the Music app

Music is nothing new to Amazon. It's been offering MP3s for sale for years, while Prime members can access several million tracks via Amazon Music . But Amazon Music Unlimited opens the company's entire catalog to those willing to pay extra.

The big difference between Spotify and Amazon Music Unlimited is Amazon offers a tier of service geared entirely toward use on devices powered by Amazon's own Alexa A.I. assistant—specifically the popular Amazon Echo , Echo Dot , and the portable Echo Tap. Just ask Alexa to start a free trial. Access via Alexa also features something called Side-by-Sides, which is sort of like a DVD commentary from an artist played along with a music track.

In the summer of 2015, Apple decided to take on Spotify with the launch of a major new paid music service built into the Music app

Music is nothing new to Amazon. It's been offering MP3s for sale for years, while Prime members can access several million tracks via Amazon Music . But Amazon Music Unlimited opens the company's entire catalog to those willing to pay extra.

The big difference between Spotify and Amazon Music Unlimited is Amazon offers a tier of service geared entirely toward use on devices powered by Amazon's own Alexa A.I. assistant—specifically the popular Amazon Echo , Echo Dot , and the portable Echo Tap. Just ask Alexa to start a free trial. Access via Alexa also features something called Side-by-Sides, which is sort of like a DVD commentary from an artist played along with a music track.

It is quite incredible how much stuff you get once you sign up for Amazon Prime. Not only do you get to watch movies and TV series online, but you can also get free shipping on your orders in the US, you get a free Prime book every month, you get access to the Prime Reading (lending library), you get free unlimited storage for photos and you can also stream music for free with Prime Music. But, how good is actually Prime Music? I have used Spotify to listen to music for a long time, but recently I decided to take a closer look at Prime Music to see how good the service actually is. Could it work for me to cancel my Spotify subscription in order to use Prime Music only?

Two millions songs are a lot, but it is not enough if you want to listen to all the newest songs from your favorite artists. And it is not enough if you want to listen to all your favorite songs from old times either. It feels more like a bit of luck if the artist and the song you are looking for is actually available with Amazon Prime. So, this is the disadvantage with Prime Music. But, considering the fact that you get it for free, it is still a great bonus coming with your Amazon Prime subscription.

If you have an Amazon Echo, Dot or a Tap, then you can sign up for only 4 USD a month to get access to all songs and play music unlimited on ONE device, and one device only. This will not work on computers or cell phones, only on the actual Echo, Dot or Tap you use to sign up.

I’m a longtime user of Spotify, a streaming music service that, for about $10 a month, offers unlimited access to a music catalog of some 30 million songs. I’ve gone so far as to delete my gigabyte-upon-gigabyte collection of music from my computer and phone, moving it to an external drive to save space. That drive collects a lot of dust in my desk drawer. So long live concert bootlegs.

Spotify has a free tier, but I pay for the advertisement-free version because I stream enough music to make it worthwhile. That said, I’ll hop on any chance to save a few bucks. So when Amazon recently unveiled a streaming service costing $7.99 for Prime subscribers , I figured, why not? (Amazon Music Unlimited costs $9.99 for non-Prime members; Prime costs $99 a year and includes free two-day shipping, among an ever-expanding list of other benefits .)

Amazon Music Unlimited has everything you’d expect from a music streaming service in 2016. For my tastes at least, the library is comparable to Spotify’s. (Amazon says it has “tens of millions” of songs.) Though any service will, obviously, miss anything that’s exclusive to the other major streaming platforms, including Apple Music and Tidal. Amazon has “hand-curated” playlists and stations, and you can download music to your phone over Wi-Fi for offline listening.

In the summer of 2015, Apple decided to take on Spotify with the launch of a major new paid music service built into the Music app

Music is nothing new to Amazon. It's been offering MP3s for sale for years, while Prime members can access several million tracks via Amazon Music . But Amazon Music Unlimited opens the company's entire catalog to those willing to pay extra.

The big difference between Spotify and Amazon Music Unlimited is Amazon offers a tier of service geared entirely toward use on devices powered by Amazon's own Alexa A.I. assistant—specifically the popular Amazon Echo , Echo Dot , and the portable Echo Tap. Just ask Alexa to start a free trial. Access via Alexa also features something called Side-by-Sides, which is sort of like a DVD commentary from an artist played along with a music track.

It is quite incredible how much stuff you get once you sign up for Amazon Prime. Not only do you get to watch movies and TV series online, but you can also get free shipping on your orders in the US, you get a free Prime book every month, you get access to the Prime Reading (lending library), you get free unlimited storage for photos and you can also stream music for free with Prime Music. But, how good is actually Prime Music? I have used Spotify to listen to music for a long time, but recently I decided to take a closer look at Prime Music to see how good the service actually is. Could it work for me to cancel my Spotify subscription in order to use Prime Music only?

Two millions songs are a lot, but it is not enough if you want to listen to all the newest songs from your favorite artists. And it is not enough if you want to listen to all your favorite songs from old times either. It feels more like a bit of luck if the artist and the song you are looking for is actually available with Amazon Prime. So, this is the disadvantage with Prime Music. But, considering the fact that you get it for free, it is still a great bonus coming with your Amazon Prime subscription.

If you have an Amazon Echo, Dot or a Tap, then you can sign up for only 4 USD a month to get access to all songs and play music unlimited on ONE device, and one device only. This will not work on computers or cell phones, only on the actual Echo, Dot or Tap you use to sign up.

I’m a longtime user of Spotify, a streaming music service that, for about $10 a month, offers unlimited access to a music catalog of some 30 million songs. I’ve gone so far as to delete my gigabyte-upon-gigabyte collection of music from my computer and phone, moving it to an external drive to save space. That drive collects a lot of dust in my desk drawer. So long live concert bootlegs.

Spotify has a free tier, but I pay for the advertisement-free version because I stream enough music to make it worthwhile. That said, I’ll hop on any chance to save a few bucks. So when Amazon recently unveiled a streaming service costing $7.99 for Prime subscribers , I figured, why not? (Amazon Music Unlimited costs $9.99 for non-Prime members; Prime costs $99 a year and includes free two-day shipping, among an ever-expanding list of other benefits .)

Amazon Music Unlimited has everything you’d expect from a music streaming service in 2016. For my tastes at least, the library is comparable to Spotify’s. (Amazon says it has “tens of millions” of songs.) Though any service will, obviously, miss anything that’s exclusive to the other major streaming platforms, including Apple Music and Tidal. Amazon has “hand-curated” playlists and stations, and you can download music to your phone over Wi-Fi for offline listening.

Boasting just a million tunes under its belt from launch – Spotify has over 30 million songs, Deezer 35 million, Apple has ‘tens of millions’ – Amazon might not be able to match the more established competition in terms of volume but its signed up some big names to get it off the ground; One Direction, Royal Blood and George Ezra rub shoulders with Bob Dylan, Madonna and David Bowie in Amazon’s VIP lounge. 

While Amazon’s own library is a little on the thin ground compared to the rest, one neat trick is that you can mix songs from your own Amazon MP3 collection with tracks from Prime Music, which you can download for offline play. 

Read our ears-on review of Apple Music Like Prime Instant Video, Prime Music is free for folks with Amazon Prime accounts. It’s the latest sweetener for those who’ve shelled out for a £79 annual Amazon Prime subscription. 

Prime Music (free for Prime subscribers ) is a neat freebie, but Music Unlimited ($7.99 per month with Prime, $9.99 per month without Prime) provides more songs and additional ways to control what you're hearing.

And while more sounds nice, I know the question on your mind: do you really need to be spending that extra cash? To find out, we've compared both of Amazon's services and even investigated how they stack up to the Spotify and Apple Music.

Amazon Prime Music and Music Unlimited both offer ad-free on-demand music listening with offline playback. Both are available on many devices, including smartphones , Amazon's Echo speaker , smart TVs , connected speakers, Macs and PCs .

In the summer of 2015, Apple decided to take on Spotify with the launch of a major new paid music service built into the Music app

Music is nothing new to Amazon. It's been offering MP3s for sale for years, while Prime members can access several million tracks via Amazon Music . But Amazon Music Unlimited opens the company's entire catalog to those willing to pay extra.

The big difference between Spotify and Amazon Music Unlimited is Amazon offers a tier of service geared entirely toward use on devices powered by Amazon's own Alexa A.I. assistant—specifically the popular Amazon Echo , Echo Dot , and the portable Echo Tap. Just ask Alexa to start a free trial. Access via Alexa also features something called Side-by-Sides, which is sort of like a DVD commentary from an artist played along with a music track.

It is quite incredible how much stuff you get once you sign up for Amazon Prime. Not only do you get to watch movies and TV series online, but you can also get free shipping on your orders in the US, you get a free Prime book every month, you get access to the Prime Reading (lending library), you get free unlimited storage for photos and you can also stream music for free with Prime Music. But, how good is actually Prime Music? I have used Spotify to listen to music for a long time, but recently I decided to take a closer look at Prime Music to see how good the service actually is. Could it work for me to cancel my Spotify subscription in order to use Prime Music only?

Two millions songs are a lot, but it is not enough if you want to listen to all the newest songs from your favorite artists. And it is not enough if you want to listen to all your favorite songs from old times either. It feels more like a bit of luck if the artist and the song you are looking for is actually available with Amazon Prime. So, this is the disadvantage with Prime Music. But, considering the fact that you get it for free, it is still a great bonus coming with your Amazon Prime subscription.

If you have an Amazon Echo, Dot or a Tap, then you can sign up for only 4 USD a month to get access to all songs and play music unlimited on ONE device, and one device only. This will not work on computers or cell phones, only on the actual Echo, Dot or Tap you use to sign up.

In the summer of 2015, Apple decided to take on Spotify with the launch of a major new paid music service built into the Music app

Music is nothing new to Amazon. It's been offering MP3s for sale for years, while Prime members can access several million tracks via Amazon Music . But Amazon Music Unlimited opens the company's entire catalog to those willing to pay extra.

The big difference between Spotify and Amazon Music Unlimited is Amazon offers a tier of service geared entirely toward use on devices powered by Amazon's own Alexa A.I. assistant—specifically the popular Amazon Echo , Echo Dot , and the portable Echo Tap. Just ask Alexa to start a free trial. Access via Alexa also features something called Side-by-Sides, which is sort of like a DVD commentary from an artist played along with a music track.

It is quite incredible how much stuff you get once you sign up for Amazon Prime. Not only do you get to watch movies and TV series online, but you can also get free shipping on your orders in the US, you get a free Prime book every month, you get access to the Prime Reading (lending library), you get free unlimited storage for photos and you can also stream music for free with Prime Music. But, how good is actually Prime Music? I have used Spotify to listen to music for a long time, but recently I decided to take a closer look at Prime Music to see how good the service actually is. Could it work for me to cancel my Spotify subscription in order to use Prime Music only?

Two millions songs are a lot, but it is not enough if you want to listen to all the newest songs from your favorite artists. And it is not enough if you want to listen to all your favorite songs from old times either. It feels more like a bit of luck if the artist and the song you are looking for is actually available with Amazon Prime. So, this is the disadvantage with Prime Music. But, considering the fact that you get it for free, it is still a great bonus coming with your Amazon Prime subscription.

If you have an Amazon Echo, Dot or a Tap, then you can sign up for only 4 USD a month to get access to all songs and play music unlimited on ONE device, and one device only. This will not work on computers or cell phones, only on the actual Echo, Dot or Tap you use to sign up.

I’m a longtime user of Spotify, a streaming music service that, for about $10 a month, offers unlimited access to a music catalog of some 30 million songs. I’ve gone so far as to delete my gigabyte-upon-gigabyte collection of music from my computer and phone, moving it to an external drive to save space. That drive collects a lot of dust in my desk drawer. So long live concert bootlegs.

Spotify has a free tier, but I pay for the advertisement-free version because I stream enough music to make it worthwhile. That said, I’ll hop on any chance to save a few bucks. So when Amazon recently unveiled a streaming service costing $7.99 for Prime subscribers , I figured, why not? (Amazon Music Unlimited costs $9.99 for non-Prime members; Prime costs $99 a year and includes free two-day shipping, among an ever-expanding list of other benefits .)

Amazon Music Unlimited has everything you’d expect from a music streaming service in 2016. For my tastes at least, the library is comparable to Spotify’s. (Amazon says it has “tens of millions” of songs.) Though any service will, obviously, miss anything that’s exclusive to the other major streaming platforms, including Apple Music and Tidal. Amazon has “hand-curated” playlists and stations, and you can download music to your phone over Wi-Fi for offline listening.

Boasting just a million tunes under its belt from launch – Spotify has over 30 million songs, Deezer 35 million, Apple has ‘tens of millions’ – Amazon might not be able to match the more established competition in terms of volume but its signed up some big names to get it off the ground; One Direction, Royal Blood and George Ezra rub shoulders with Bob Dylan, Madonna and David Bowie in Amazon’s VIP lounge. 

While Amazon’s own library is a little on the thin ground compared to the rest, one neat trick is that you can mix songs from your own Amazon MP3 collection with tracks from Prime Music, which you can download for offline play. 

Read our ears-on review of Apple Music Like Prime Instant Video, Prime Music is free for folks with Amazon Prime accounts. It’s the latest sweetener for those who’ve shelled out for a £79 annual Amazon Prime subscription. 

Prime Music (free for Prime subscribers ) is a neat freebie, but Music Unlimited ($7.99 per month with Prime, $9.99 per month without Prime) provides more songs and additional ways to control what you're hearing.

And while more sounds nice, I know the question on your mind: do you really need to be spending that extra cash? To find out, we've compared both of Amazon's services and even investigated how they stack up to the Spotify and Apple Music.

Amazon Prime Music and Music Unlimited both offer ad-free on-demand music listening with offline playback. Both are available on many devices, including smartphones , Amazon's Echo speaker , smart TVs , connected speakers, Macs and PCs .

Let’s set the scene: a tiny Swedish company, virtually unknown, releases a brand-new way to listen to music. It allows you to stream any genre at any time for a monthly flat rate. As Spotify steadily gathers customers and signs more record labels (and artists), it has the looks of being a triumphant underdog story. But, to make it interesting, there’s got to be a little conflict, and that’s where Apple Music and Amazon come in. 

The second anniversary of Apple Music’s release is quickly approaching and, with it, Spotify beginning to feel the tremors of competition for the title of “Best Streaming Service”. Amazon, of course, also had to get its hands in the midst of the booming music-streaming business by releasing Prime Music in June 2014 and then Amazon Music Unlimited in October 2016. 

Since Spotify launched in 2008, it has worked tirelessly to achieve and maintain its position as the number-one music-streaming service.

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